Racism is the New Racism

Below is an insightful piece by my best friend and college roommate, Maddie. She offers a fresh perspective on racism in America today. She is currently earning her master’s degree in school counseling. Make sure to check HEAD BITCHES IN CHARGE for more guest posts from Maddie in the future!

“Though there are many, many people who would disagree with me, I firmly believe that racism is alive and well in the United States, and around the world. In many cases, this is not the outright racism of generations past, characterized by segregation, genocide, and the outspoken public opinion that White people are superior to all others (though it should be noted that violent racial crimes still occur daily), but a quieter, more conniving racism that lurks in our everyday lives, and goes mostly unnoticed by Whites like myself. However, if we take a moment to stop and open our eyes and our minds, it is obvious that racism has permeated almost every aspect of life in the United States.
The simple and irrefutable truth is that we are a nation of contradictions. We pride ourselves on our “melting pot” philosophy, while simultaneously committing daily acts of racism and microagressions towards all those members of our nation who aren’t White. Numerous social experiments show that Whites are often served before African-Americans and Latino/as at restaurants and stores, even if the latter was there first. Whites continue to have much higher average incomes, education levels, and general social statuses, even though time and time again it has been proven that there is no difference in intellectual or genetic capabilities that make whites superior in any way. (The fact that I just had to write that sentence actually makes me physically ill). We boast about the “American Dream,” touting that if you work hard enough you will be successful in this country, but then systematically force racial minorities into menial and dead-end jobs. It’s no secret that there is a glass ceiling for all non-Whites in this country, but Whites pretend not to see this. Instead, we reiterate our tired notion that anyone can get ahead in life if they just work hard enough. In plain terms, we chalk up the huge poverty rates and under-employment among minorities to laziness.
Newsflash, people: IT’S FUCKING NOT. Crack open a book, do a google search, or even just talk to ANYONE from any minority group. Many people from minority groups work two to three jobs to support their families. Women from minority groups are much more likely than White women to hold down a full time job while also caring for children. And perhaps most shocking of all to those who don’t know better is that the majority of people in this nation who receive welfare benefits are in fact (rural) Whites. Many times, the true cause of the staggering poverty rates is that minorities are continuously beaten down from climbing the social ladder by racial profiling that prevents them from ever getting ahead. Though not all White Americans take part in systematic racial profiling, most of us choose to either ignore it, deny it, or have no idea that it’s even happening.
Basically it boils down to this: Why are we still having this conversation? How is it even possible that it is 2014 and our society is still operating from racist notions about minorities? Based on an informal poll I conducted, I discovered that the majority of White people do not view racism as an issue in the United States. However, almost every person from a minority group (Black, Latino/a, and Asian-American) stated that they “strongly agree” that racism is an issue in the U.S. They’re not wrong. Every day, minority groups in the United States must live with the unspoken and crippling truth that White Americans have always held almost one hundred percent of the political, financial, educational, and social power and privilege in the United States. Pardon my French, but this is bullshit. If these problems are not fixed, if White Americans don’t start to realize their White privilege and work with minorities to fix our broken social system, then we might as well change our slogan from “The Great American Melting Pot” to the “Great American Taco Dip” where White-Americans get to be the easily accessible delicious cheese at the top, and minorities are all the way down at the bottom of the dish where no one dares to go for fear of breaking their tortilla chip.
Hopefully, our generation or our children’s generation can put an end to this quiet racism once and for all. Think about it like this: Judging a person based on the color of their skin is the exact same thing as judging a person based on the color of their eyes. Imagine how ridiculous it would be to go around telling people that those who had green eyes were superior to those with brown and blue eyes. It’s equally ridiculous to do this with skin color. It’s a body part, people. Body parts come in different colors. Get the fuck over it. Once we open our eyes and minds and realize how juvenile it is to judge another person, and then to systematically stop them from the highest levels of success they are able to achieve, solely because of their skin color, we will feel sick to our stomachs, ashamed of our ignorance and will demand change.”

-Maddie

Racism is the New Racism

Below is an insightful piece by my best friend and college roommate, Maddie. She offers a fresh perspective on racism in America today. She is currently earning her master’s degree in school counseling. Make sure to check HEAD BITCHES IN CHARGE for more guest posts from Maddie in the future!

“Though there are many, many people who would disagree with me, I firmly believe that racism is alive and well in the United States, and around the world. In many cases, this is not the outright racism of generations past, characterized by segregation, genocide, and the outspoken public opinion that White people are superior to all others (though it should be noted that violent racial crimes still occur daily), but a quieter, more conniving racism that lurks in our everyday lives, and goes mostly unnoticed by Whites like myself. However, if we take a moment to stop and open our eyes and our minds, it is obvious that racism has permeated almost every aspect of life in the United States.
The simple and irrefutable truth is that we are a nation of contradictions. We pride ourselves on our “melting pot” philosophy, while simultaneously committing daily acts of racism and microagressions towards all those members of our nation who aren’t White. Numerous social experiments show that Whites are often served before African-Americans and Latino/as at restaurants and stores, even if the latter was there first. Whites continue to have much higher average incomes, education levels, and general social statuses, even though time and time again it has been proven that there is no difference in intellectual or genetic capabilities that make whites superior in any way. (The fact that I just had to write that sentence actually makes me physically ill). We boast about the “American Dream,” touting that if you work hard enough you will be successful in this country, but then systematically force racial minorities into menial and dead-end jobs. It’s no secret that there is a glass ceiling for all non-Whites in this country, but Whites pretend not to see this. Instead, we reiterate our tired notion that anyone can get ahead in life if they just work hard enough. In plain terms, we chalk up the huge poverty rates and under-employment among minorities to laziness.
Newsflash, people: IT’S FUCKING NOT. Crack open a book, do a google search, or even just talk to ANYONE from any minority group. Many people from minority groups work two to three jobs to support their families. Women from minority groups are much more likely than White women to hold down a full time job while also caring for children. And perhaps most shocking of all to those who don’t know better is that the majority of people in this nation who receive welfare benefits are in fact (rural) Whites. Many times, the true cause of the staggering poverty rates is that minorities are continuously beaten down from climbing the social ladder by racial profiling that prevents them from ever getting ahead. Though not all White Americans take part in systematic racial profiling, most of us choose to either ignore it, deny it, or have no idea that it’s even happening.
Basically it boils down to this: Why are we still having this conversation? How is it even possible that it is 2014 and our society is still operating from racist notions about minorities? Based on an informal poll I conducted, I discovered that the majority of White people do not view racism as an issue in the United States. However, almost every person from a minority group (Black, Latino/a, and Asian-American) stated that they “strongly agree” that racism is an issue in the U.S. They’re not wrong. Every day, minority groups in the United States must live with the unspoken and crippling truth that White Americans have always held almost one hundred percent of the political, financial, educational, and social power and privilege in the United States. Pardon my French, but this is bullshit. If these problems are not fixed, if White Americans don’t start to realize their White privilege and work with minorities to fix our broken social system, then we might as well change our slogan from “The Great American Melting Pot” to the “Great American Taco Dip” where White-Americans get to be the easily accessible delicious cheese at the top, and minorities are all the way down at the bottom of the dish where no one dares to go for fear of breaking their tortilla chip.
Hopefully, our generation or our children’s generation can put an end to this quiet racism once and for all. Think about it like this: Judging a person based on the color of their skin is the exact same thing as judging a person based on the color of their eyes. Imagine how ridiculous it would be to go around telling people that those who had green eyes were superior to those with brown and blue eyes. It’s equally ridiculous to do this with skin color. It’s a body part, people. Body parts come in different colors. Get the fuck over it. Once we open our eyes and minds and realize how juvenile it is to judge another person, and then to systematically stop them from the highest levels of success they are able to achieve, solely because of their skin color, we will feel sick to our stomachs, ashamed of our ignorance and will demand change.”

-Maddie

Tis the Season!

As holiday season approaches, I wanted to take a moment to preemptively discuss the inevitable annual debate: Do you wish someone ‘happy holidays’ or something else? Forewarning: I am straightforward here, and if you disagree, feel free to leave a comment and say why.


1. Say, for example, you celebrate Christmas but you know your friend celebrates Hanukkah. 

Wish them a Happy Hanukkah. If they’re cool, they’ll wish you a Merry Christmas. If they say ‘Happy Hanakkuh’ then just say thank you!! It’s really not a big deal.

I personally exchange gifts with some of my other faith-based friends and we aren’t coy about what we say or how we say it.


2. Say you are atheist and your friend is religious. 

Just wish them a ‘Merry Christmas’ or a ‘Happy Hanakkuh’ (etc.).

Don’t be like this:

or this


3. Say you are religious and your friend is atheist.

Wish them a Merry Happy whatever you are. It doesn’t matter!! Then just move on.


4. Say you and your friend are both atheist and don’t celebrate anything.

Then, so what? Don’t say anything!!


5. Say you are not sure what someone else is.

If you celebrate Christmas, say ‘Merry Christmas and happy holidays!” If they don’t like it, they’ll probably correct you. You did nothing wrong. And, for example, if they respond back with “Happy Kwanzaa” then just say ‘Thank you!’ … because, after all, they cared enough to wish you well.

xx Nicki

‘Tis the season

As holiday season approaches, I wanted to take a moment to preemptively discuss the inevitable annual debate: Do you wish someone ‘happy holidays’ or something else? Forewarning: I am straightforward here, and if you disagree, feel free to leave a comment and say why.


1. Say, for example, you celebrate Christmas but you know your friend celebrates Hanukkah. 

Wish them a Happy Hanukkah. If they’re cool, they’ll wish you a Merry Christmas. If they say ‘Happy Hanakkuh’ then just say thank you!! It’s really not a big deal.

I personally exchange gifts with some of my other faith-based friends and we aren’t coy about what we say or how we say it.


2. Say you are atheist and your friend is religious. 

Just wish them a ‘Merry Christmas’ or a ‘Happy Hanakkuh’ (etc.).

Don’t be like this:

or this


3. Say you are religious and your friend is atheist.

Wish them a Merry Happy whatever you are. It doesn’t matter!! Then just move on.


4. Say you and your friend are both atheist and don’t celebrate anything.

Then, so what? Don’t say anything!!


5. Say you are not sure what someone else is.

If you celebrate Christmas, say ‘Merry Christmas and happy holidays!” If they don’t like it, they’ll probably correct you. You did nothing wrong. And, for example, if they respond back with “Happy Kwanzaa” then just say ‘Thank you!’ … because, after all, they cared enough to wish you well.

xx Nicki

5 times the workplace can be an absolute nightmare for women

These are some of my examples, all of which have happened to me in my years during/since college. It is absolutely disgusting how women are treated by this systemic sexism.



1. It was (basically) unspoken, but expected that I would take out the trash.

At one of my much older jobs, the trash was the job of everyone in the office. Or at least, so I was told. I was the only female and when I would start to take out my own trash, the others would say, “Oh, can you grab mine too?” Otherwise, it would just sit there piling up endlessly.

Eventually, I started taking my trash out when no one else was there so I wouldn’t be tricked into taking everyone’s out. While this might have not had to do with gender, the males should have been aware of what was happening. They were slobs, too.



2. I was paid 50% of what my male counterparts were making. 

I was paid a sickeningly low amount at one of my old jobs. I started the job needing it to graduate from college because it was part of the program. I was a full time, day employee with the same skills as the males. I was performing the same work. I had always assumed we all made low amounts, but one day I was informed what one of the males was making. It was double what I was making, and I was told we didn’t have enough money to pay anyone that much.



3. I was forced into being the receptionist.

Two different jobs. I was forced into being a receptionist in two different jobs. NO males were ever asked nor forced into it. I had even asked this question in both jobs, several times, and the answers were either evasive or that ‘the owner likes a woman to sit up front’ and that he is a ‘traditional man’. I was hired to do other work in both jobs, and both times it was also my duty to sit at the receptionist desk. I was performing very well at what I was hired to do, and don’t get me wrong – I still had those duties too, but I was also assigned the job as a receptionist (against my will). I fought it, requested formally by letters and e-mail, and was still made to do this job.



4. Males hush other males who swear and say ‘there’s a lady in the room’

This is something that doesn’t offend me. I have no problem when men swear because I swear too. I feel immediately uncomfortable when people feel the need to call attention to my gender and then stop talking. YET – moving onto #5, this type of conversation is never okay:



5. Males start having open conversations saying things like “Women should have to take a test to have a baby” and use the excuse that I was a ‘cool’ female who was able to hang with the guys as to why they would say such things in front of me.

I overhead many conversations like this at an old job. Most of the comments were by people in positions higher/much higher than mine. I ended up leaving this company, combined with reason #2, and demanding to be paid what I was actually worth. We settled in mediation and I was financially reimbursed.

xx Nicki

Apple and Google are offering to pay for their female employees to freeze and store their eggs

As with any effort to help females in the ever present struggle for gender equality, both praise and criticism will arise. No solution can ever be completely satisfactory.

Apple and Google are offering to pay for EVERY SINGLE FEMALE EMPLOYEE
to freeze their eggs and store them if they so choose – a procedure that can cost up to $10,000 with a $500 fee for storage, according to tech crunches article.

As expected, the gesture is receiving quite a bit of flack. Some females claim this is just another excuse for employers to implicitly pressure employees into choosing work over personal life. Apple and Google have worked hard to preemptively refute that claim by offering extended maternity leave, infertility treatments, and adoption assistance. But of course criticism of the employer being too privy about their employee’s personal life has come to light.

The option is out there. It’s not forced upon employees. I am, however, slightly torn because while this is empowering to women, it also makes them think twice about child birth. They know that the option is there to wait and the microscopic level of employee to boss interaction could be slightly more biased than the corporate headquarters plans for them to be.

It’s a step in the right direction. It’s not the final solution, but any female acknowledgment is better than none.

xx Nicki